Vision Correction

LASIK is the safest ophthalmic surgical procedure performed today. Some of those who have undergone laser vision correction call the procedure a modern miracle. Since their inception in the late 1980s, laser vision procedures have been performed on over 10 million people. Before these procedures came around, people were forced to rely on either glasses or contact lenses to correct their refractive errors. Today’s advances in surgical therapy and lasers give us the opportunity to have a life that is free of glasses and contact lenses.

Common Conditions and Laser Vision Correction

LASIK is the safest ophthalmic surgical procedure performed today. Some of those who have undergone laser vision correction call the procedure a modern miracle. Since their inception in the late 1980s, laser vision procedures have been performed on over 10 million people. Before these procedures came around, people were forced to rely on either glasses or contact lenses to correct their refractive errors. Today’s advances in surgical therapy and lasers give us the opportunity to have a life that is free of glasses and contact lenses.

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Am I a Good Candidate for Vision Correction?

Laser vision correction is used to treat patients with myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness) and/or astigmatism. You should have a stable correction/refraction that has not changed recently, and your eyes should be normal and without disease. Also, your cornea must be thick enough for the laser vision procedure to be safely done, without leading to post-operative troubles.

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Types of Laser Vision Correction

Glaucoma is a group of diseases that damage the eye’s optic nerve. Without treatment, glaucoma can progress to permanent, irreversible vision loss. There are different types of glaucoma. Most occur when pressure in the eye (intraocular) increases, damaging the optic nerve but sometimes optic nerve damage can occur even when intraocular pressure is normal.

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Alternatives to Laser Vision Correction

Age-Related Macular Degeneration or AMD is one of the leading causes of vision loss of in people over the age of 50. This condition is painless, and occurs because small yellow waste deposits, known as drusen, accumulate in the macula. The macula is the central part of the retina, and is responsible for our sharpest and clearest vision. These drusen deposits result in damage to the macula, and lead to a loss of the central vision. The good news is that macular degeneration will not lead to total blindness. There are two forms of macular degeneration.

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